...ABOVE NORMAL RAINFALL...
...COLDER THAN NORMAL 
TEMPERATURES RETURN...
...SEASONAL SNOWFALL AMOUNTS 
FAR BELOW NORMAL...

Other than the headlines above, will let Patrick Maloit's and Eleanor Vallier-Talbot's (CHS) summaries "do the talking for March." 

Patrick Maloit's (NWS AKQ) March 2001 Hydrological Report:  "There was above normal rainfall in March across most of central...south central and southeast Virginia...Northeast North Carolina... and the Virginia and lower Maryland Eastern Shores.  The month featured near normal snowfall across the Maryland Eastern Shore... Northern Neck...and the Central Virginia Piedmont. Snowfall for March was below normal across Northeast North Carolina...and the remainder of central...south central...and Southeast Virginia.  Most of the precipitation that fell in March occurred in the last half of the month...including two coastal storms that affected the region  the last 10 days of the month. 

March 2001 precipitation totals ranged from 3.18 inches at Ocean City to 7.45 inches at John Kerr Dam in Mecklenburg County. Snowfall totals ranged from a trace at several locations...to 3.5 inches at Louisa in the Central Virginia Piedmont region.

Snowfall for the season of 2000-2001 ended up below normal at most locations...except across interior northeast North Carolina...and southern parts of the cities of Tidewater Virginia where it was at or above normal. Snow totals ranged from a trace at Emporia...to 12 inches at aptly named Snow Hill on the lower Maryland Eastern Shore.

High pressure moved from the Mid-Mississippi Valley on the 1st...to offshore on the 2nd...as a weak area of low pressure moved from the Central Rockies...to the Appalachians...and then offshore. This disturbance produced light rain across the region from the 2nd into the 3rd. High pressure moved from the Central Plains on the 3rd to Southern Canada on the 4th. Low pressure moved from the Tennessee 
River Valley on the 4th to off the Maryland coast on the 5th spreading light rain across the region. 

Weak high pressure moved in briefly on the 5th...before a trough of low pressure moved across Virginia and Maryland that afternoon. Its passage  brought with it a burst of arctic air...and light snow across the Mid Atlantic by the morning of the 6th. Canadian high pressure built in from the upper plains from the 6th into the 8th. 
The high gave way to a cold front that moved across the region on the morning of the 9th...spreading light showers with it.

High pressure slowly moved from the corn belt on the 9th to off the North Carolina coast on the 11th. A dry cold front passed through the region late on the 11th. Behind the front...high pressure built down from Southeast Canada into the 12th.  Low pressure moved from northern Iowa on the 12th...to the upper peninsula of Michigan on the 13th. As it did so it lifted a warm front northward...that ended 
up in a "u" shape across Central Virginia on the 13th. This caused light precipitation on the 12th and 13th...as a complex low pressure system pulled offshore by late on the 13th. 
 
 

 


ACON - VA/NC/SC
The Atlantic Coast Observer Network: 
Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina
http://www.pilot.infi.net/~bsmoot/acon.htm

SUMMARY OF CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA
MARCH 2001



(continued from left column)

High pressure built into the Tennessee Valley on the 14th...then off the Maryland coast on the 15th. A low pressure system moved from northern Alabama on the 15th to off the New England coast on the 16th...while a second low pressure system moved from kansas on the 15th...to near St. Louis on the 16th...to off the New Jersey coast on the 17th. These two systems produced moderate to heavy rainfall 
across the region...including 24 hour maxima for the month at the Salisbury airport (1 inch - 16th) and at Lawrenceville in southside Virginia (0.77 inches - 16th-17th). 

Canadian high pressure slowly moved from the upper plains on the 17th...across the Great Lakes...to New England on the 20th...then to the Canadian Maritimes on the 21st. Meanwhile...low pressure developed over the central Gulf of Mexico on the 19th...moved to south-central Georgia on the 20th...to central NC on the 21st...then to off the New Jersey coast by the morning of the 22nd. This slow moving low pressure system produced several 24-hour rainfall maxima across the region during the period from the 19th to the 20th. 

These included 1.24 inches at Petersburg from the 19th-20th...and 3.80 inches reported by the Salisbury co-op observer from the 20th-21st (one of 17 locations reporting at least 1.5 inches during the period). The nor'easter also caused a daily maxima of 2.30 inches at Bremo Bluff on the 21st...2.05 inches at Palmyra on the 
21st-22nd...both in the Central Virginia Piedmont...and 1.05 inches at Crisfield on the Maryland Eastern Shore on the 22nd.

High pressure moved from the Great Lakes on the 22nd to central Florida on the 24th. A cold front moved across the region on the 24th...then stalled out along the coast. A wave of low pressure developed along the front over southeast Georgia on the 25th and moved northeast. This produced light rain across coastal locations from the 25th into the 26th. Meanwhile...high pressure built in from the upper plains from the 25th through the 28th...moving to western Maine by the morning of the 29th. 

Low pressure developed in the Gulf of Mexico late on the 28th...and moved northeast to the panhandle of Florida on the 29th. This low merged with a low pressure system moving eastward from the central plains on the 29th...to form a potent low pressure system centered near Wilmington...Delaware the morning of the 30th. This nor'easter produced the remainder of the 24 hour precipitation maxima for the month across the region...including .90 inches at Wakefield on the  29th...and 2.62 inches at Alberta in southside Virginia from the 29th to the 30th.

The low pulled away on the 31st...as high pressure built down from New England. Its trailing cold front stalled out along the North Carolina-Virginia border...spreading scattered light precipitation across the region on the 31st.

ACON VA/NC/SC Member Station Extremes - March 2001
State
Maximum Temperature
Minimum
Temperature
Warmest
Average
Temperature
Coldest
Average
Temperature
Maximum
Precipitation
Minimum
Precipitation
Virginia
77° Norfolk
(NOR)
13°
Louisa (LKU)
New Market
47.8° 
Portsmouth
38.2°
Blacksburg
6.11"
Roanoke (ROK)
3.27"
Woodstock
North Carolina
78°
Wilmington
17° 
Brevard
53.0° 
Wilmington
44.6° 
Asheville
8.26"
Wilmington
4.31"
Lumberton
South Carolina
80°
Charleston
27°
Columbia
Greenville-Spartanburg
56.6°
Charleston
49.5°
Greenville-Spartanburg
7.18"
North Myrtle Beach
4.40"
Florence

Virginia:

Annandale -  Lowell adds these observations: "March was the first month in the last 5 that had above normal precip.  The month was cold with a -2.7° departure.  15 days had temps 32° and below, the most since 1996.  The highest temp for the month was 64° on the 11th & 24th which set a new 21 year record low max for March.  The old record was 67° in 1984.  On March 6th, both the max and min were 21 year record lows for the date.  The highest barometric pressure for the month was 30.52" which was the lowest max barometer for March since 1992.  The predominant influencing weather feature for the month was low pressures on 16 days and tied a 15 year record.  On March 26th, the max was 12° below the 21 year record for the date.  On the 27th, the min was 5° below the 21 year record for the date.  It has never been any colder for so late in the spring."

Arlington - NWS WBC reports: "No new records were set in Washington in March.  March is typically a transition month into spring. This year it was a slightly wetter version of february as temperatures were similar...rain fell on a similar number of days...and snowfall continued to be hard to come by.

Temperatures were three and a half degrees below normal which was not record breaking...but it was the third coldest march of the past decade. By the end of March...average temperatures rise into the lower 60s. During the last half of this March...with the exception of a brief two day warm up...temperatures never rose past the middle 50s. That included the cold and windy 26th...when it barely broke out of the 30s. On the whole...the vast majority of days were in the 40s and 50s...with five days in the 60s and one day...the 6th...that did not make it out of the 30s.

Precipitation fell on eleven days...much like February with ten.  However there was much more of it during those 11 days...including two days with over an inch. The month ended up a bit wetter than normal with nearly four inches of precipitation...our greatest monthly total since September. This was our sixth year in a row with
Above normal precipitation during March.  Even with cooler than normal temperatures and more precipitation than normal...washington received less than a half inch of snowfall this March. This was a continuation of our sub par snow season this year. The 2000-01 winter season has produced about seven and a half inches of snow...our lowest total since the nearly snowless 1997-98 season three years ago. Every month this season produced below average snowfall.

Blacksburg - Temps were 3.5° below normal while precip was just below normal, -0.07". - NWS RNK

Bridgewater - Clayton sends these notes:  ""This has been another winter of very little snow.  This makes two consecutive winters with little snowfall.  My 37 year average has dropped now from 24" to around 22.5".  A very strong northeaster occurred on the 21st with heavy rain, and around a foot of snow in the mountains just west of us.  The winds were quite strong.  Snow fell for about an hour on the 29th with no accumulation.  According to my records, the latest snow for a winter season occurred on April 12th.  I consider April 15 as my cut-off day for any more measurable snow.  With the present weather pattern, I don't expect to see any more snow this season.  The rainfall for the month was 0.67" above normal.  This is the first month in the last six with precipitation above normal.  This winter has been another dud and quite boring.  I enjoy more active winter weather!"

Centreville - Paul send his notes via email: "March was too sure about what it was supposed to do this year.  Except for a couple of good rain events, I'd give it a yawn overall.  I'll give March some credit for trying to start off as a lion though, when 1.7" of snow fell on the 5th, but you had to look quickly.  It was going downhill fast at 11AM with just a wayward flurry to be seen.  By noon, one had to really study the situation to find any white stuff, and by 1 PM the streets were actually dry with obscure patches lingering in the shadows on grassy areas and that was fading fast.  Mid-month was gloomy with light rain, drizzle, mist, and light fog finishing with a 1.40" steady rain over an 18-hour period.

Temperatures were actually fairly constant throughout the month with the average daily high of 41.5° being about 1° below the expected average.  The first week and the last week average daily highs were only separated by 1/2°, which suggests either a weak lion or a heck of a strong lamb.  The average daily high and average daily low both occurred on March 2nd.  Nightly lows were true to form being warmer by 1.6° above the 31.3° average for March.  On the 29th, a light rain began in the morning and later became heavy at times.  The accumulator showed 1.58" for the day which contributed to an excess of 1.57" of the typical monthly average 3.43".  Over that 22-hour rain event, 1.81" of rain tipped our bucket.

Charlottesville - Rainfall for the month was 0.69" above normal. - NWS WBC

Falls Church - "March 2001 was a cooler than normal month but slightly above normal in rainfall.  On March 13, strong storms moved through the area bringing high wind gusts. 52 mph was the highest gust!!!  I haven't seen winds like that since hurricane Dennis in 1999!!!!" - notes from Erica

Hampton - The month was quite chilly, but also fairly dry.  The weather around Hampton Roads is this way in March/April; it can be warm then very chilly near the shore.  Am looking forward to continued warming rend and some rainfall. - Dave

Herndon - "March temperatures here averaged almost a degree above my norm, continuing the trend which started in January.  However, most notable were the record low temps on the 27th and 28th during a brief cold snap.  Rainfall was plentiful at an inch above normal.  No big snowstorms here this season." - notes from Russ

Lynchburg - The mean temp was 3.4° below normal while precip was 1.43" above the norm. - NWS RNK

New Market - "Temperatures for the month were below normal.  We had 2 good rains since the 21st of the month and that saved us this month.  They were very welcomed rains.  Our pond is full for the first time in a long while.  The winds have been very, very strong during March.  We have had 15 days of 30 mph or more winds with 5 days in the 40 mph range, and 1 day in the 50 mph range." - from Joyce

Newport News - "A fairly 'normal' month with a record low on the 27th and 28th." - Gary

Norfolk - From  NWS AKQ:  The monthly precip was 1.02" above normal.  The average wind speed was 9.6 mph.
Portsmouth - March was below average in temperature (-1.6o ) with precipitation 0.12" above normal (103%).  A wind speed average of 5.7 mph from a dominant northerly direction was observed.  Rainfall for the year improved and is 69% of the norm (-3.54") and March was the wettest month of the year to date.  March records included a daily minimum max of 39° on the 6th, a daily snowfall record of 0.3" on the same day, a daily precip record of 1.27" on the 21st, a daily minimum max temp of 45° on the 26th and a daily minimum temp tie of 28° on the 28th.  The year's lowest barometric pressure to date was recorded on the 6th with 29.474".

Richmond - According to NWS AKQ:  Richmond's rainfall was 0.16" above normal.  The average wind speed was 8.9 MPH.

Mechanicsville -  "A thunderstorm on the 13th in the afternoon.  Brief periods of snow on the 6th." -Glenn

Roanoke -  "Temperature averages were 3.8° below normal.  Rainfall was above normal (+1.0") - notes NWS RNK

Roanoke - March was cold and wet.  But with temperatures 4° below normal and precip 2.19" above the norm, there was still very little snow.  1.2" for the month was 1.4" below the normal March snowfall.

Vienna - Bob sends this report:  "February was much warmer (+3.0°) than my average and also drier than average for both rain and total snowfall.   Readings of 60° or higher were recorded on four days. The monthly max was 70° observed on the 9th. Only one day had a max  temp of 32° or colder (29°/22nd). Most other daily readings were in the 40s and 50s. The monthly minimum was 16° which is within my typical February range. Measurable snow occurred on just two days (5th and 22nd). Windy conditions occurred on a number of days/nights with frontal passages or strong  zonal, SW flow.  As a harbinger (?) of spring, I spotted my first Robin on the 17th."
Washington - Dave reports: "December was the 2nd coldest month I've recorded in the 10 years I have been at this location, about 9o below the normal."

Weems - Frank Socey writes that at 87+ his memory is becoming a bit dull.  Also, he's been quite ill of late waiting for some heat and sunshine to create better feelings.  He adds, "Naturally, I keep my fingers ready for new ideas and some of the discoveries in the mysteries of weather even though I am on my 75th year of learning."

Woodstock -  The month of March was very cool (3rd coolest in 16 years) while normal precip fell.  2001 cumulative precip is about 1" below the 16-year average but was just about equal to the reported 1950-70 average for this part of the Shenandoah County. - notes from Lauck

North Carolina:
Asheville - From NWS GSP: The monthly mean temp was 2.8o below normal while rainfall  was 0.37" above normal.  The average wind speed was 9.9 mph.

Brevard -  Bob reports: "March was a cool month with a mean high temperature of 59.2° F and mean low of 33.1° F compared with 10 year averages of 61.4° and 34.9°.  The month average, 46.2°, was 2° below the 10 year mean.  The month was slightly on the dry side, 5.96", compared with a 10 year mean of 7.04".  The 8.3" of snow that fell occurred on the first day of spring/  Moisture through March measured 14.48" for the year, well-below the 10 year mean of 21.19".  The shortage of rain is in the third year.  Cloud cover averaged 50% for the month."
Charlotte - NWS GSP reports the mean temp here was 2.2o below normal while precip was 1.25" above normal.  The average wind speed was 7.4 mph.

Concord - Tom noted: "March ended with a surplus in rainfall which was the first time in six months that we averaged above normal for the month.  Mandatory water restrictions are still in place in the immediate area with rainfall since July 1998 some 35+ inches BELOW normal during the drought, almost a whole year's total of 45+ inches.  Long range forecasts suggest less than normal rainfall and warmer than normal temperatures through the next six months.  Things look to get much worse before any improvement begins."

Lumberton - The average wind speed was 8.2 MPH.  - from NWS ILM

Greensboro - The mean temperature- according to NWS RAH - was 2.9° below normal while rainfall was 1.33" in excess of the norm.

Raleigh -   NWS RDU reports the mean temperature was 1.3° below normal while rainfall for the month exceeded the norm 3.34".  March was the 3rd wettest at the airport since 1944.  The 1.55" that fell on the 20th was the highest recorded for that day.  A record high minimum temperature of 59° was set on the 13th.

Raleigh (RAL) - Bob sends these notes: "After a rather mild January and February, March did a reverse being a cold and damp month.  The average daily temp was over 3° below normal.  The 6.63" or rain was 2.86" above normal.  No snow or ice was observed during the month."

Roxboro - Merriell reports:  "March was breezy and much wetter than normal.  Almost twice the normal rainfall was noted.  Temperatures averaged about 2° below normal."
Wilmington -  From NWS ILM:  The average wind speed was 9.3 mph, the average temperature was 1.4o below normal while rainfall was 4.38" in excess of the norm.  A record 24-hour precip record of 3.99" on the 20th (old record 2.27" set in 1924)-

South Carolina:

Columbia - NWS CAE reports the average relative humidity was 64% while the average temperature was 6° below normal.  Rainfall was 0.51" above normal.  For the year rainfall is running 4.26" below the normal. - NWS CAE

Charleston - Eleanor at NWS CHS forwards these notes: "Records:  Charleston International Airport: March 15, 24-hour max precip 1.47" (previous record 1.26" set in 1964); March 20, 24 hour max precip 2.07" (previous record 1.35" set in 1970).  No other records set.

What a turnaround from the previous months!  Several storm systems moved across the region during March, depositing much needed rainfall.  Several locations across southern and central South Carolina reported above normal precipitation in March, including Columbia, Orangeburg, and Myrtle Beach.  Temperatures also ran cooler than the normal due to 12 days with measurable precipitation with a lot of clouds around.  Two precip records were set in Charleston with over 1" of rainfall during both storms.  Ironically, the warmest temperature for the month was 1° cooler than the highest reading in February.  Rainfall was nearly 2" above normal, but still did not bring the yearly total above normal.  since January 1st, the yearly rainfall remains close to 1.5" below normal."  Monthly precipitation was 1.96" below normal and the mean temp was 1.5o above normal.  Year-to-date precip is running 1.41" below normal."
Florence - NWS ILM reports the mean temp there was  1.8o below normal while rainfall was 0.28" above normal.  No temp or precip records were set/tied this month.
Greenville-Spartanburg - The monthly temps averaged 2.2o below normal while total rainfall was 1.3" above normal.   The average wind speed was 8.5 mph.  - NWS GSP
North Myrtle Beach - From NWS ILM:  Rainfall was 2.58" above normal.  Temps averaged 1.7o below normal.  The average wind speed was 8.1 MPH.   A low temperature record tied on the 11th (29°).

Orangeburg - The average relative humidity was 69%. (from NWS CAE)

Nearby Cities:
Tri-cities/Bristol area noted temps averaging 4.3o below the norm with total rainfall about normal (-0.01"). - from NWS Morristown, TN

(Please note the column denotations table below.)
TEMPERATURES / WIND / ELEMENTS


VIRGINIA

STN  A      B    C    D      E F     G    H I  J K L  M     N  O P Q R R1 S
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ANN 51.26 33.19 42.23 64 11,24 21   27   0  0 15 0 40 WSW  15  0 0 0 0  1 2400
                                                   33 W    30
BCB             38.2                               51 NW    6             2400
BRI 51.5  29.4  40.5  68    30 16   28   0  0 19 0             0 0 0 0  1 0530/1600
CEN 50.0  32.9  41.5  63    11 19   27   0  0 18 0 21 104 21  0 0 0 0  0 1200/2400
                                                   21 W     9
CHO 53.8  32.1  42.9  69    30 18   27   0  0 16 0 44 300 23  1 0 0 0  1 2400
DCA 52.3  35.2  43.7  66 11,24 25 6,27   0  0 11 0 48 290 13             2400
IAD 51.1  30.1  40.6  64 11,13 17   27   0  0 19 0 51 280 13             2400
FCH 51.6  35.0  43.3  65 11,24 25 6,27   0  0  9 0 52      13  1 0 0 0  0 2400
HAM 54.3  38.6  46.5  75    13 26    6   0  0  5 0 50 ESE  21  0 0 0 0  2 2400
HER 49.8  31.2  40.5  62.4  24 19.2 27   0  0 18 0 31    6,22  0 0 0 0 NR 2400
HRN 49.5  31.4  40.1  62.9  13 18.5 27   0  0 17 0 39 NE    6  0 0 0 0  0 2400
LKU 53.58 27.03 40.31 68    24 13   27   0  0 21 0 32 NE    6  0 0 0 0  1 2400
LOU 52.2  30.4  41.3  68    13 18   27   0  0 21 0             0 0 0 0  1 0800
LYH             42.6  71    24 18   27             37 NW    6             2400
NEW 50.03 28.10 39.07 64    11 13 27,28  0  0 18 0 52 N     6  0 0 0 0  2 1700
NPN 55.5  36.5  46.0  76    13 24    6   0  0  9 0 42 NW    6  0 0 0 0  2 2300
NOR 55.9  38.4  47.2  77    13 25    6   0  0  6 0             1 0 0 0  2 2400
ORF 54.3  38.6  46.4  75    13 26    6   0  0  5 0 43 230 24  1 0 0 0  5 2400
POR 55.9  39.8  47.8  74    13 27    6   0  0  4 0 38 WNW   6  2 0 0 0  0 2400
MEC 57    34    45    74    13 21 27,28  0  0  9 0             1 0 0 0  0 1800
RIC 55.8  34.6  45.2  74    24 22   27   0  0 12 0 45 310 13  0 0 0 0  2 2400
ROA             43.4  69    24 22   27             49 NW   13             2400
ROK 53.1  32.8  42.8  70    24 19   28   0  0 16 0 48 NW   13  0 0 0 1    2200
AKQ 57.90 33.23 45.56 75    13 18 27,28  0  0 17 0                        2400
WEE 51.9  30.3  41.1  72    13 20   27   0  0  5 0 40 W     6  1 0 0 0  1 1600
WOO 49.6  31.4  40.5  66    14 19   27   0  0 16 0             0 0 0 1  5 0800
WSH 50.8  31.2  41.0  65.0  11 19.2 27   0  0 17 0 33 ENE  22  0 0 0 0  1 2400
NORTH CAROLINA

STN  A      B    C    D      E F    G     H I  J K L  M     N  O P Q R R1 S
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AVL 54.4  34.7  44.6  65    11 21    6   0  0 13 0 56 NW                  2400
BRE 59.2  33.1  46.2  69    15 17 8,27   0  0 15 0 35       6  1 0 0 0  3 1600
CLT 59.4  38.0  48.7  76     2 22    8   0  0  7 0 40 NW                  2400
CND 59.2  36.6  48.4  74.9  13 23.9  8   0  0  8 0 25 E    20  2 1 0 0  3 2400
LBT 62.1  39.8  51.0  76    13 26    8   0  0  8 0 45 310  6  1 0 0 0  4 2400
RAL 59.5  35.1  47.3  75    13 21 27,28  0  0 10 0 31      13  1 0 0 0  3 2400
ROX 55.9  36.2  46.1  72    13 21   27   0  0  9 0 35 NW    6  1 0 0 0  2 2100
ILM 63.1  42.9  53.0  78    13 30 11,28  0  0  4 0 47 310  6  2 0 0 0  2 2400
SOUTH CAROLINA

STN  A      B    C    D      E F    G    H  I  J K L  M     N  O P Q R R1 S
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CAE 64.5  41.5  53.0  76     4 27  8,28                                   2400
CHS 66.9  46.2  56.6  80    16 31    7   0  0  1 0 44 NW    6  4 0 0 0  1 2400
CRE 61.5  42.9  52.2  78    13 29   11   0  0  5 0 52 08  20  0 0 0 0  3 2400
                                                   30 NNW  17   
FLO 65.2  42.3  53.7  79    13 29    8   0  0  4 0 45 180 12  0 0 0 0  4 2400
GSP 59.6  39.4  49.5  76     2 27    8   0  0  8 0 44 040                2400
OGB 65.3  42.5  53.9  79 13,16 28    7                                    2400
NEARBY LOCATIONS

STN  A      B    C    D      E F    G     H I  J K L  M     N  O P Q R R1 S
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TRI 53.7  32.0  42.9  70     4 19 8,10,  0  1 16 0                        2400
                                    28
CHW 41.0  23.9  32.4  62.3   9  3.2  3   0  7 21 0                        2400

(Please note the column denotations table below.)
PRECIPITATION / BAROMETRIC PRESSURE

VIRGINIA

STN  T     U       V      V1   W X   Y      Z  1  2 3    4    5      6       7        S
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ANN  4.69  1.45 29 1.80 29-30 13 1  9.48  1.4  5  2 1  1.5 12.8  30.52  19 29.47  13 2400
                                                                        20
BCB  3.78      
BRI  3.99  1.74 21 1.74 21     9 2  6.71  0.3  4  2 0  0.3  8.6  30.32     29.65     0530/1600
CEN  5.00  1.58 29 1.81 29-30 14 2  8.69  1.7  5  2 1  1.8 14.2  30.48  19 29.66  22 2400
CHO  4.44  1.91 29 1.91    29 10 2        0.0          0.0       30.46  19 29.47  13 2400
DCA  3.91  1.27 29 1.46 29-30 11 2  8.96  0.2  5  2 0  0.2  7.4                      2400
IAD  4.41  1.33 29 1.49 29-30 12 2  8.35  1.0  5  2 1  1.0  9.8                      2400
FCH  3.49  1.03 21 1.05 21-22 10 1  7.89  1.0  5  1 1  1.0 10.0                      2400 
HAM  4.12  1.10 21            12 1  4.12  0.0          0.0  1.5                      2400
HER  4.68  1.42 29 1.60 29-30 14 2  9.54  1.0  5  2 1  1.1 15.4  30.47  20 29.27  13 2400
HRN  4.80  1.48 29 1.67 29-30 13 2  9.40  1.5  5  2 1  1.5 13.0  30.467 19 29.492 13 2400
LKU  5.16  2.07 29 2.27    29 11 0  8.63  0.0          0.0  3.0  30.51     29.64     2400
LOU  4.75  2.10 29             4 2 10.70  0.0          0.0  3.0  30.50  27 29.62  12 0800
LYH  4.90
NEW  3.61  1.46 21            11 0  6.73  0.5  6  1 0 0.75 12.3  30.657 12 29.712 10 1700
NPN  3.63  1.08 21 1.14 20-21 14 1  7.64  0.3  6  1 0  0.3  2.6  30.44  19 29.41  13 2300
NOR  5.13  1.56 21 1.56    21 13 1  9.04  0.3  6  1 0  0.3  1.3                      2400
ORF  4.72  1.45 21 1.60 21-22 14 1  8.34  0.3  6  1 0  0.3  1.6  30.41  28 29.52  22 2400
POR  4.33  1.27 21 1.27    21 15 1  8.04  0.3  6  2 0  0.3  1.6  30.410 19 29.474  6 2400
MEC  4.28  1.44 21 1.55 21-22 10 1  9.42 0.25  6  1 0 0.25  5.4  29.91  20 29.18  13 1800
RIC  3.77  1.10 29 1.26 29-30 11 1  8.38  0.5  5  3 0  0.5  5.5  30.48  19 29.48  13 2400
ROA  4.48
ROK  6.11  2.05 29 2.34 20-21  6 0  3.23  3.0 22  3 1  3.2  6.2  30.57  12 29.82  10 2400
AKQ  3.56  0.90 29            12 2  7.71  0.6  5       0.6  8.0  30.41  19 29.58  13 2400
WEE  4.57  1.72 21 1.72    21  8 1        2.0  6  5 1  2.0                           1600
WOO  3.27          0.98 29-30 12 0  6.75  1.7 3,5 3 1  2.2 17.7  30.72  19 29.80   6 0800
WSH  4.92  2.06 21 2.35 20-21 10 2  7.38  0.7  5  4 0  0.7  9.5  30.51  19 29.52  13 2400
NORTH CAROLINA

STN  T     U       V      V1   W X   Y     Z   1  2 3  4     5       6       7        S
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AVL  5.00  1.42 20 1.51 20-21 10 2 10.36  5.0 21       6.4 15.3  30.39  19 29.53   4 2400
BRE  5.96  1.67 29 1.67    29  9 2 14.48          2 1  8.3  8.7  30.30  19 29.60   4 1600
CLT  5.68  2.13 29             9 2  9.74   T             T  2.7  30.41  19 29.57   4 2400
CND  5.55  1.65 29 1.65    29 10 1  9.63  0.0          0.0  4.0  30.42  19 29.58   5 2400
LBT  4.31  1.01 15 1.08 20-21  8 1  7.98  0.0          0.0  0.0  30.42  19 29.56   4 2400
RAL  6.63          2.16 20-21 14 1 10.80  0.0          0.0  3.0  30.42  28 29.53  13 1900
ROX  7.14  2.22 29 2.22    29 13 3 12.23  0.0          0.0  0.5  30.48  19 29.55   5 2100
ILM  8.26  3.99 20 4.05 20-21 11 2 11.22  0.0          0.0  0.2  30.39  19 29.56   5 2400
SOUTH CAROLINA

STN  T     U       V      V1   W X   Y     Z   1  2 3  4     5       6       7        S
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CAE  5.33                           9.10  0.0          0.0    T                      2400
CHS  6.30  2.07 20 2.14 19-20 12 3  9.68  0.0          0.0    T  30.32  28 29.68  20 2400
CRE  7.18  2.07 20 2.14 20-21 11 3 10.98  0.0          0.0  0.0  30.38  19 29.58   5 2400
FLO  4.40  1.05 15 1.05    15 11 1  7.87  0.0               0.0  30.38  19 29.55   4 2400
GSP  6.69  2.02 29             9 3 12.01  0.8 20       0.8  6.3  30.39  19 29.56   4 2400
OGB  5.76                          10.50  0.0          0.0                           2400
NEARBY LOCATIONS

STN  T     U       V      V1   W X   Y     Z   1  2 3  4     5       6       7        S
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TRI  3.69          1.17 29-30 14 1 10.83                                             2400

COLUMN DENOTATIONS:
A  maximum mean temperature T total precipitation (inches)
B  minimum mean temperature U maximum calendar day precipitation (inches)
C  monthly mean temperature U1 date of maximum calendar day precipitation
D  maximum temperature V date(s) of maximum daily precipitation
E  date(s) of maximum temperature V1 maximum 24-hour precip. & date(s)
F  minimum temperature W number of days with precip. >= .01"
G  date(s) of minimum temperature  X number of days with precip. >= 1.0"
H  days with maximum temperature >=90 Y year-to-date precipitation (inches)
I  days with maximum temperature <=32 Z maximum calendar day snowfall (inches)
J  days with minimum temperature <=32 1 date of maximum calendar day snowfall (inches)
K  days with minimum temperature <= 0  2 number of days with snowfall
L  peak wind gust (miles per hour)  3 number of days with snowfall >= 1.0"
M  direction of peak wind gust 4  total snowfall for month (inches)
N  date(s) of peak wind gust  5 total snowfall for 2000-2001 season (inches)
O  number of days with thunder  6 maximum barometric pressure (inches)
P  number of days with hail 6A date of maximum barometric pressure 
Q  number of days with glaze 7 minimum barometric pressure (inches)
R  number of days with ice pellets 7A date of minimum barometric pressure
R1 number of days with dense fog (i) incomplete data
S  local observation time for temps/precipitation (M) Missing, if listed in data table
 ~ "about" E estimated
 +  additional indeterminate number of days NR not recorded

STATION  /  LOCATION (MILES & DIRECTION FROM MAIN POST OFFICE) /
OBSERVER  / YEAR RECORDS BEGAN /  EMAIL ADDRESS:

ANN    Annandale, VA 1 3/4 ENE - Lowell Koontz  12/90  wwkoontz@bellatlantic.net ROK   Roanoke, VA 6SW Wendell Prillaman  4/76
DCA    Arlington, VA NWS Webmaster (Sterling):  james.decarufel@noaa.gov VNA    Vienna, VA Robert Boott, 1.5SW Robert.Boott@tma.osd.mil
BCB    Blacksburg, VA NWS Webmaster:  William.Perry@noaa.gov AKQ    Wakefield, VA NWS Webmaster:  Neil.Stuart@noaa.gov
BRI     Bridgewater, VA Clayton Towers Ctowers@rica.net WSH   Washington, VA  David Yowell runamok@runamok.com
CEN   Centreville, VA Paul Bassett 1985 pbassett@sitestar.net WEE   Weems, VA 3WNW Francis J. Socey
CHO   Charlottesville, VA  Airport ASOS  (Rappahannock County) WOO  Woodstock, VA 5NW Lauck Walton - 12/1/85 jwalton@shentel.net
IAD     Dulles International Airport  Webmaster (Sterling): james.decarufel@noaa.gov AVL    Asheville, NC NWS NWS GSP:  bryan.mcavoy@noaa.gov
FCH    Falls Church, VA Erica Page - 3/7/94 Windie1970@aol.com BRE    Brevard, NC 1SE Bob Keehn 1/1/90 Bob_Keehn@citcom.net
FRB    Fredericksburg, VA 7SW Ken McKneely mckneelys@email.msn.com CLT    Charlotte, NC NWS NWS GSP:  bryan.mcavoy@noaa.gov
HAM    Hampton, VA 5NE Dave Kessel 1989 dckessel@home.com CND  Concord, NC 3 W, Highway 73, 2 miles E of I85.  stormwatch@vnet.net
HER    Herndon, VA R.M. Beall P- 10/76   T-  1/91 beall47@earthlink.net GSO   Greensboro, NC NWS Webmaster (Raleigh/RAH): Richard.Jones@noaa.gov
HRN   Herndon, VA 4SW Russ Topping -  1985 rtopping@erols.com RAL    Raleigh, NC 7NNW  Bob Woodson 6/1/93 kf4mmm@qsl.net
LKU     Louisa, VA 1N Joseph Bowers 1944 - NWS ID  44-5050-02 jmbiii@earthlink.net RDU   Raleigh-Durham, NC NWS Webmaster:  Richard.Jones@noaa.gov
LOU     Louisa, VA 6S John Bullock (about 1970) LBT    Lumberton, NC FAA Lumberton 34o 37'N 79o  04'W
LYH     Lynchburg, VA NWS Webmaster (Blacksburg):  William.Perry@noaa.gov ROX    Roxboro, NC 2SE Merriell A. Jay 1/93
NEW    Newmarket, VA 2W Joyce Winfree joywood@shentel.net ILM     Wilmington, NC NWS  nwsilm@wilmington.net
NPN     Newport News, VA 7N Gary Leonard -  6/91 GaryMLeonard@aol.com CHS   Charleston, SC NWS, courtesy of Eleanor Vallier-Talbot
Eleanor.Vallier-Talbot@noaa.gov
evaltal@wpmedia.com
Webmaster Contents CHS: Theodore.Rodgers@noaa.gov
NOR     Norfolk, VA 3NE Jim Fentress 6/1/77 CAE    Columbia, SC NWS caewx@noaa.gov
  OGB   Orangeburg, SC NWS caewx@noaa.gov
ORF     Norfolk, VA 5NE NWS 1871 Webmaster (Wakefield): Hugh.Cobb@noaa.gov GSP   Greenville-Spartanburg, SC NWS bryan.mcavoy@noaa.gov
POR     Portsmouth, VA 3S Bill Trotter -  7/1/76  pwrs@pilot.infi.net RUB    Ruby, SC 3 NW Franklin Hancock
MEC     Mechanicsville, VA Glen Martin 11/19/91 FLO    Florence, SC nwsilm@wilmington.net
RMD    Richmond, VA Roy Britt 8/22/83  roybritt@earthlink.net CRE    North Myrtle Beach, SC  nwsilm@wilmington.net
RIC     Richmond, VA NWS TRI     Tri-cities/Bristol, TN  NWS Webmaster (Morristown):W-Mrx.Webmaster@noaa.gov
ROA    Roanoke, VA  Webmaster (Blacksburg):  William.Perry@noaa.gov CHW  Canaan Heights, WV Dave Lesher  wxdave@boo.net