NEW MEMBER, NEW STATION: 
HARRISONBURG (HRG)


 

Terry Slagle in Harrisonburg has joined us this month!  He sends some information about himself and his station: "I am 36 years old and have lived in Harrisonburg for the past 4.5 years. I became interested in weather while living in Florida during my high school and college years. The threat of a tropical storm or hurricane gets everyone's attention. For the 8 years I lived in Florida I never experienced a hurricane. That came once I moved to North Carolina and went through Hugo in 1989.

I have had a wireless Davis Monitor II weather station since May 2000 and have been using it to archive the weather and post information hourly to my website. I use Virtual Weather Station software to keep the website current. The website can be
viewed at http://harrisonburgweather.com. (Altitude at Harrisonburg is 1306')."

Welcome Terry!!



...Quiet First half for May 2001... 
...A Far More Active Second Half...

While there was no severe weather of note in April, the change of seasons in May brought about considerable shower and thunderstorm activity in the latter half of the month.

Early in the month, a high pressure ridge built over the Mid-Atlantic.  The period was dry but punctuated by scattered afternoon showers and thundershowers over western areas of VA and NC into NW SC resulting from weak low pressure in the vicinity triggering activity in conjunction with daily heating of the atmosphere.  Temps reached 90° for the first time this year in western areas of the tri-state area; but temps closer to the coast only rose to the upper 80s in most locations.  Nighttime lows ranged from the 30s and 40s in western areas of VA to the lower 60s by the 4th and 5th over SE VA. 

On May 5th high pressure moving from south-central and SE Canada across the Great Lakes and New England south along the coast sent a cold front to the VA border and NE NC by evening.  The front activated considerable scattered shower and thunderstorm activity prompting warnings across western and central VA and as far east as the Isle of Wight County.  The coasts of VA and NC escaped the activity that produced downpours for the warnings areas.  On May 6th:  As of 9 AM cold front had only made it to southern NC.  (no active weather along it at that time.)  As high pressure built in from the north on the 7th, strong onshore winds at coastal areas of North Carolina created watches for overwash at the Outer Banks and for rip currents.
Some areas of showers formed along SC/GA border late at night into early Monday the 7th.  NWS WBC reported a 20th consecutive day without rain at Washington-Reagan National Airport in Arlington, VA as of the 8th, far from the record 33 days set August 7 - September 7 in 1995.

First severe weather outbreaks were noted from NWS local storm Reports on May 12th as wind damage was reported in Kingsboro and Edgecombe, NC.  And thus began a period of severe outbreaks lasting the entire month over VA, NC, and SC with local storm reports indicating wind damage, hail, and severe thunderstorms, much to be expected as the seasons change.

On the 17th, flash flood watches were issued for the Appalachians as a front hung in the mountainous areas.  Several inches of rain fell from cells and thunderstorms over western and southwestern VA into northwest NC as warm, Gulf air was pulled well to the north along the chain.  Willis, Pulaski, Bland and Radford in Virginia reported 2 day rainfall totals of just over 3.5" of rain.  Staffordsville in Giles County reported nearly 4.5" in the same time period.  The heavy rains would continue into the following week with continued flash flood watches and warnings.  Monthly rainfall totals for flood watch areas included: Blacksburg (7.89") and Roanoke (6.68" at ROK).

By the 18th and 19th, shower and thunderstorm activity moved east to the coast.  The activity continued in the western areas with ongoing flash flood watches and warnings with new rounds of convection aided now by the development of southerly winds from high pressure off the SE US coast.

For North and South Carolina, a noticeable increase in severe weather around the 19th and 20th with wind damage reported.  Flash flooding still reported in SW and western VA and thunderstorms produced hail in south central VA into north central NC.

On the 21st, a line of thunderstorms and sightings of funnel clouds in Suffolk, VA prompted NWS Wakefield to inform the public of possible tornadic development although no touchdowns were noted and weak rotation noted on radar dissipated.

On the 22nd, severe reports of wind damage (large trees down) from Palmyra, Fluvanna, Green Springs, Louisa, Caroline and Fort Hill, VA  with a possible tornado at Caroline.  Some hail also reported near Carmel Church.  Gust winds reported across all of northern VA extending eastward into MD.  Meanwhile, flash flooding still persistent in Alleghany County, Collierstown, and Rockbridge in western VA as reported by NWS Blacksburg
The Roanoke Airport reported a 63 mph wind gust and wind damage reports came in from residents in the area. Wind damage on this date was also reported from Hendersonville, NC.

On Friday the 25th, a rather noteworthy tornado touched down in Waldorf, MD at 4:30 PM.  Funnel clouds were reported in nearby locales.

Of special note were the dry conditions along the SC coast with an unually low 1.36" at Charelston.  Rather dry as well over central and eastern NC, compared to the other reporting stations throughout the region.

Here's Patrick Maloit's (NWS AKQ) MAY 2001 Hydrological Report Narrative Summary: After a dry start...the month of May ended on a wet note...as a series of cold fronts moved across the Mid-Atlantic states in the last half of the month. The late month rain was not enough however...to prevent below normal precipitation across most of central and southeast Virginia...and northeast North Carolina.


ACON - VA/NC/SC
The Atlantic Coast Observer Network: 
Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina
http://www.pilot.infi.net/~bsmoot/acon.htm

SUMMARY OF CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA
MAY 2001


 Only the Northern Neck...south central Virginia...and portions of the lower Maryland Eastern Shore had near normal...to above normal rainfall in May.May 2001 precipitation totals ranged from 1.30 inches at the American Water Company in Hopewell...to 6.87 inches at Gwynn's Island in Mathews County. An area of high pressure slowly moved southwest from off the Mid-Atlantic coast...into South Carolina from the 1st through 4th. This kept the region dry...except for some light showers in the Virginia Piedmont on the 4th...triggered by a trough of low pressure in the lee of the Appalachian Mountains.  A relatively weak cold front moved across the region the night of the 4th...moving offshore on the 5th. While the passage of the front brought generally light showers to the Mid-Atlantic states...it did bring about the 24-hour rainfall maxima for the month at Petersburg...where 1.60 inches fell from the 4th to the 5th...and at Emporia of 1.20 on the 5th. Behind the front...high pressure built down from Canada from the 5th to the 8th. A weak cold front moved through the area late on the 8th...causing light showers across the Piedmont region. High pressure built in from the southern plains behind the front...slowly moving off the southeast coast on the morning of the 12th. A cold front moved through the area from the midwest on the 12th...moving offshore by the morning of the 13th. The showers and thunderstorms with this front...produced a 24-hour maxima for May at the Elizabeth City Coast Guard Station of 1.05 inches on the 12th. On the 13th...high pressure built in from the Great Lakes...moving to the Atlantic coastal plain on the 15th. A warm front stalled out across western Virginia and central North Carolina on the 16th. Rain on the east side of the front produced 24- hour maxima for may of 0.67 inches at Jackson, North Carolina from the 15th to the 16th. The weather pattern remained nearly stationary through the 18th...when the high moved offshore...and the stationary front moved slowly north as a warm front...stretching across southern Virginia the morning of the 19th. Rainfall ahead of this warm front caused some 24-hour rainfall maxima for the month across the region...including 0.90 inches from the 18th to the 19th at Snow Hill on the lower Maryland Eastern Shore...1.13 inches at the Salisbury Airport on the 19th. This front then sagged south and stalled out across central North Carolina on the 20th...then moved north to southern Virginia as a warm front (again) on the 21st...and continued north to the Mason-Dixon line by the morning of the 22nd. The second visit of the front to the region produced more rainfall maxima for May including...2.30 inches at Clarksville in Mecklenburg County (19-20th)...1.07 inches at the Norfolk International Airport (20th-21st)...0.74 inches at Assateague Island (21st)...and 1.42 inches at Louisa (21st-22nd). A cold front pushed through the region late on the 22nd...moving offshore by the morning of the 23rd. This produced 1.42 inches of rain in less than a 24 hour period on the 22nd at the co-op observer location in Salisbury. Weak high pressure built in from the central plains from late on the 22nd through the 24th. A warm front lifted north from Georgia...to central Virginia by the morning of the 25th...and then north to southeast Pennsylvania by the morning of the 26th. The passage of the warm front created more 24-hour maxima for rainfall in May...with 2.5 inches at Vienna in Dorchester County (24-25th)...and 2.20 inches at Corbin in Caroline County on the 25th. A cold front passed through the Mid-Atlantic states during the 26th...producing several 24 hour rainfall maxima for the month...including 2 inches at the Crisfield Coast Guard Station in Somerset County on the 26th. Weak high pressure built in from the plains from the 26th into the 27th. A cold front slowly moved across the region on the 28th...before stalling out as a stationary front from the Eastern Shore to central North Carolina on the 29th. Another cold front pushed its way across the region from late on the 29th into the 30th. The net result of the passage of these two fronts was the setting of a number of 24- hour rainfall maxima across the area including 2.02 inches at Princess Anne in Somerset County from the 28th-29th. An area of high pressure built in from the Great Lakes from the 30th to the 31st to close the month on a dry note. Spring of 2001 had below normal precipitation across most of central and southeast Virginia...and northeast North Carolina...and near to above normal across most of south central Virginia...the Northern Neck...and the lower Maryland and Virginia Eastern Shore. Spring 2001 rainfall ranged from 6.47 inches at Edenton in northeast North Carolina...to 13.53 inches at the Salisbury co-op observer site in Maryland.


HAM RADIO & ARPS - Bob Woodson (RAL) has linked his Davis Weather Station with a 2 meter HT radio to transmit weather information via APRS . The NWS at RDU can see current weather information from area hams that who weather stations without using the Internet. Information regarding APRS can be found at http://www.centralcarolinaskywarn.net.

MEMBER INTERNET HOMEPAGES - Remember...some of our members display their weather data - current and archived - on the Internet.  You can click through to them while online by visiting the ACON - VA/NC/SC main home page.  Many offer much more that data!!
http://www.pilot.infi.net/~bsmoot/acon.htm


 
ACON VA/NC/SC Member Station Extremes - May 2001
State
Maximum Temperature
Minimum
Temperature
Warmest
Average
Temperature
Coldest
Average
Temperature
Maximum
Precipitation
Minimum
Precipitation
Virginia
92°
Centreville & Newport News
32°
Blacksburg & Louisa (LKU)
68.8° Norfolk (NOR)
59.8°
Harrisonburg
7.89"
Blacksburg
1.42"
Richmond (RMD)
North Carolina
95°
Wilmington
37°
Brevard
70.1°
Wilmington
63.6°
Brevard
4.21"
Brevard
2.30"
Concord
South Carolina
96°
Orangeburg
47°
Greenville-Spartanburg
72.7°
Columbia
68.4°
North Myrtle Beach
4.53"
Columbia
1.36"
Charleston

Virginia:

Annandale -  Lowell reports: "May was a month  of extreme split personality as the 1st half was extremely dry and the 2nd half was very wet.    The average minimum temperature  dep. was 0.75°f and the max. was  - 0.22°; thus the mean was  surprisingly a little above ave. +0.27°;   May 8th was the 20th day without measurable rain - rainfall on the 9th was 0.05 inches.  The record for the last 21 yrs. is 22 days.   The most unusal reccord was the high barometer reading of May 6th, the highest barometer ever recorded in  <ay at this station.   On the 22nd we set a new rainfall record for the date 1.51 inches. That was also the most rain in a  may day since 1997.   The temp. range for the 26th  was only 2°, the smallest daily temperature ever recorded for the date and ties the 21 year record for the lowest temperature range ever recorded any date of the year!  From April 18 until May 18th  we have had only 0.08 inches of rain in the last 30 days. The 89°f maximum on the 4th  was a new 21 year record high maximum for the date by 8 degrees."

Arlington - NWS WBC reports: "Early May continued with the dryness of April. After less than two inches of rain during April...the first eight days of May were rain free. That produced a 20 day stretch without rain...extending back into late April. Talk soon turned to drought as water levels dipped and crops were stunted. This intensified as the next nine days produced only a few hundredths of rain...stretching the dry spell to nearly a month. Things changed around mid May however as a large and deep stationary low developed over the upper midwest states. This whirlpool in the atmosphere drew moist air from the Gulf of Mexico...while small areas of low pressure spun around the larger low to our west. The result was a rainy last half of May...with three and three quarters of an inch of rain falling during the final two weeks...and that was a low figure regionally. Generally between three and six inches of rain fell during the last half of May around the region. While the first half of May was warm and dry with temperatures generally in the 70s and 80s...the second half was cooler and damp with high temperatures generally in the 60s and 70s. There were also a few severe weather outbreaks during the second half of May. The district received damaging winds on the 22nd...and a tornado was confirmed in the northern suburbs during an outbreak of severe thunderstorms on the 27th.  Mean temps were 0.5° below normal while rainfall was 0.05" above normal. "

Blacksburg - Temps were 0.2° above normal while precip was 4.01" above normal. - NWS Blacksburg

Bridgewater - Clayton reports:  "The first half of May was dry and hot while the last half was cool and wet. The first fifteen days produce only .05 inches of precipitation while 3.59 inches ocurred during the last sixteen days. There were eight consecutive days with measurable precipitation. During this rainy spell, eleven out twelve days had measurable rain. Precipitation for the year now is 12.3 inches which is 2.55 inches below normal."

Centreville - Paul notes: "May began where April left off; hot and dry, but all in all we just about broke even for averages.  Naturally the average nightly lows were above normal.  By two degrees above the 50.2° normal in fact, and the overall average temperature for the month was 63.2°; less than a degree above what wed normally expect for May.  The maximum of 92° on the 4th and the minimum of 36° on the 7th; a spread of 56°, occurred over a period of 64 hours; a little less than three days.  The heck with this phenomena weather, Im heading to Florida.  At least there its hot and dry (drought) there all the time.

The first half of May continued to be dry.  How dry was it you ask.  Four weeks with just 0.02 of measurable precip until the 16th.  For May, thats dry.  Then it really poured, and by the end of the 17th we had actually doubled the amount of the past 28 days with an additional 0.04.  The next two weeks made up for lost time though with 3.87 more rain giving us a surplus for May of 0.29.  The greatest daily amount occurred on the 22nd with 1.26 being partially to blame for delays with arrivals at Dullas airport.  The rest of the blame along the East coast goes to severe thunderstorms in and around Orlando, FL which is exactly where I was trying to leave from.  My luggage?  It wasnt on the same plane as me but then, I may have been expecting too much with only six hours for the airlines to get it all figured out.  Cheers. "

Charlottesville - Rainfall for the month was 1.64" below normal. - NWS WBC

Dulles  - NWS WBC reports the mean temp was 0.8° in excess of the norm.  Rainfall was 1.77" above normal.

Falls Church - "May 2001 was slightly cooler  than normal but above average in rainfall.  There were 6 days of stormy weather with about half of those days having severe weather." - notes from Erica

Hampton - Dave reports two station record ties during the month.  The max of 89° was tied on the 11th and the max of 90° was tied on the 12th.

Harrisonburg - Terry sends these observations: " 0.10" of rain on May 16 ended a streak of 23 days with only .28" of rain during that time. The 2.54" total for May was the second highest month so far this year."

Herndon - Russ sends these notes: "May rainfall was 1.77 inches above normal. We had measurable rain for much of the latter half of the month, after a month went by with less than one tenth of an inch. Temperatures averaged 0.8°
degrees above normal, with no records set."

Lynchburg - The mean temp was 2.1° below normal while precip was 0.40" above the norm. - NWS Blacksburg

Louisa - Joe noted that finally some decent rains have arrived.  With over 4" in May and another 4" in June (through the 19th), he's spending quite a bit of time on his lawnmower.

New Market - Joyce notes via email: "Temperature is 6° below normal for mean for month. We did have normal rain fall finally after the middle of the month. Still are below normal for yearly rainfall. The ground is still dry but workable. We were much warmer the first part of the month than the last part. In fact one of the coldest nights was the 31st."

Newport News - Gary sends these notes: "First 12 days of the month were dry and warm (5 record highs and 1 tie!!)  Rest of the month was cooler and wetter."

Norfolk - From  NWS AKQ:  The monthly precip was 0.92" below normal while the monthly mean temp was 0.4° above normal.  The average wind speed was 9.0 mph.  For the year, rainfall is deficient by 5.11".

Portsmouth - The average temp here was about normal, +0.2°, while precip was only 86% of the normal (-0.56").  The average wind speed was 4.09 mph from a dominant southerly direction.  May station records included: 4th - maximum temperature TIE - 87° (previously in 1996);  5th - maximum temperature - 88° (previously 87° in 1980);  21st - Daily precipitation 1.03" (previously 0.68" in 1982);  22nd - Maximum minimum temperature 70° (previously 68° in 1984);    26th - Daily precipitation 1.21" (previously 0.98" in 1994).  For the year, rainfall is 70% of the norm, or 5.79" in deficiency.

Mechanicsville -  "Thunderstorms occurred on the 12th, 18th, 19th, 22nd, 25th, & the 28th which is a lot of t-storms!  None were severe." - notes from Glenn

Richmond - According to NWS AKQ:  Richmond's rainfall was 1.81" below normal.  The average wind speed was 6.6 MPH.  Temps averaged 0.8° below normal.  Rainfall for the year is running 4.26" below normal.

Roanoke (ROA) -  "Temperature averages were 0.9° above normal.  Rainfall was above normal (+1.63") - notes NWS Blacksburg

Roanoke (ROK) - "A big turn-around in May from a hot and dry first half to a cool and rainy second half resulting from heavy rainfall.  The average temp was 0.3° above average and the rainfall was 2.34" above average."

Woodstock -  "Temperatures were very near my 16 year average.   Precipitation was lacking in the first fortnight of the month, but after that we had soaking rains and thunderstorms to bring us well above average for the month...4th highest in 16 years.    This brings precip for the first five months of the year slightly above the 1950-1970 average as shown in the Virginia Climatological Survey, but it's still 3 inches below my 1986-2001 year average for the same period." - notes via email from Lauck

North Carolina:
Asheville - From NWS GSP: The monthly mean temp was 1.0o above normal while rainfall  was 1.96" below normal.  The average wind speed was 5.2 mph.

Brevard -  Bob sends this summary: "May, 2001 was a temperate month, the mean, 76.0° F, high was 1° below expected (the 1990-1999 average) while the mean low, 51.1° F, was 0.4° below normal.  Heating 30 day degree days was 84% of normal while cooling was 49% of the normal for May. The month yielded slightly more rain than expected, 4.21" compared with 3.63", but we are still almost ten inches below the expected YTD total, 19.5" compared with 29.35". Cloud  cover averaged 71% for the month."

Charlotte - NWS GSP reports the mean temp here was 0.8° above normal while precip was 1.17" below normal.  Yearly rainfall totals at the end of April were 4.91" below normal.

Concord - Tom eamils his report: "May continued the trend of being drier than normal with rainfall only 66% of what it should have been for the month. Temperatures were almost normal or only +0.1° above normal for the month. Yearly rainfall is now -6.43" below average or 67% of what it should be through May. Severe drought conditions continue across the Western NC Area with water restrictions still in place locally."

Greensboro - NWS RAH reports a record low max temp of 60° on the 17th.  The monthly mean temp at Piedmont Triad Airport was 0.4° in excess of the norm whle rainfall was 1.33" below normal.

Lumberton - The average wind speed was 5.9 MPH.   - from NWS ILM

Raleigh (RAL) - Bob writes: "Weather for May can be described as near normal temperatures, but below normal rainfall. Even though rainfall was below normal, precipitation was observed on thirteen (13) days. No severe weather at this station, however severe wether wtaches were issued at least three(3) times in May.

Have linked my Davis Weather Station with my 2 meter HT radio to transmit weather information via APRS . The NWS at RDU can see current weather information from area hams that have weather stations without
using the Internet. Information regarding APRS can be found at http://www.centralcarolinaskywarn.net.

Raleigh (RDU) - NWS RDU reports a record low max temp set on consecutive days... 63° on the 16th & 60° on the 17th.  Temps averaged 1° above normal while rainfall was deficient by 0.39"

Roxboro - From Merriell,  "May was dry with no rainfall the first two weeks.  The month total rainfall was about 1" below normal.  Temperatures averaged near normal although there were cool and warm periods."

Wilmington -  Excerpts from the NWS ILM narrative summary: A sunny and drier than normal may for the port city...  No temperature records were broken or tied for the month.  Total rainfall for the month was 1.35 inches below normal. May was sunnier than normal. with 77% of possible sunshine and the normal was 67%.   Cooling degree days totaled 178 units in May. This amount was 10 units above normal. The seasonal total is 295 units... 75 units above normal. Heating degree days totaled 14 units in May. This amount was 4 units above normal. The seasonal heating degree total grew to 2718 units... 248 units above normal.  The average wind speed for may was 7.2 mph.

South Carolina:

Columbia - NWS CAE reports the average relative humidity was 65% while the average temperature was 1.8° above normal.  Rainfall was 0.85" above normal.  For the year rainfall is running 6.08" below the normal.

Charleston - NWS CHS reports that the mean temp was 0.5° below normal while precip for the month was 2.65" in deficiency.  Average wind speed was 7.8 mph.

Florence - NWS ILM reports the mean temp there was 1.3° above normal while rainfall was 1.79" below normal.  The average wind speed was 6.9 mph.

Greenville-Spartanburg - The monthly temps averaged 0.9° above normal while total rainfall was 2.28" below normal.   The average wind speed was 6.1 mph.  - NWS GSP
North Myrtle Beach - From NWS ILM:  Rainfall was 0.81" below normal.  Temps averaged 1.3o below normal.  The average wind speed was 8.0 MPH.   Records: High temp set on the 19th (90°) beating old record 89° in 1996.

Orangeburg - The average relative humidity was 66%. (from NWS CAE)

Nearby Cities:

Tri-cities/Bristol area noted temps averaging 1.8°  above the norm with total rainfall below normal (-0.09").  For the year, rainfall is 0.79" below normal  - from NWS Morristown, TN

(Please note the column denotations table below.)
TEMPERATURES / WIND / ELEMENTS

VIRGINIA

STN  A      B    C    D      E F     G    H I  J K L  M     N  O P Q R R1 S
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ANN 75.06 54.87 64.97 89     4 40    7   0  0  0 0 29 NNW  30  5 0 0 0  0 2400
                                                   33 W    30 
BCB             60.2  84     3 32   14             38 W    22             2400
BRI 74.0  51.0  62.5  88     2 36   14   0  0  0 0             3 0 0 0  1 0530/1600
CEN 74.2  52.2  63.2  92     4 36    7   3  0  0 0 21 327ø 12  5 0 0 0  0 1200/2400
CHO 73.8  50.8  62.3  89     4 38    8   0  0  0 0 24 200° 25  7 0 0 0  6 2400
DCA 75.0  56.7  65.9  88    11 46    7   0  0  0 0 37 300° 30  4 0 0 0  2 2400
IAD 74.5  50.7  62.6  90     4 33    7   1  0  0 0 38 260° 22             2400
FCH 74.7  56.3  65.5  88    11 46    7   0  0  0 0             6 0 0 0  1 2400
HAM 77.3  59.9  68.6  90    12 51   14   1  0  0 0 42 N    18  1 0 0 0  0 2400
HRG 70.5  49.0  59.8  82.9   4 34.9 14   0  0  0 0 23 W     5  1 0 0 0  3 2400
HER 73.7  52.7  67.2  88.0   4 37.9  7   0  0  0 0 24      30  4 0 0 0 NR 2400
HRN 72.6  52.3  62.6  87.8   4 36.8  7   0  0  0 0 41 NW   22  1 0 0 0  1 2400
LKU 73.65 47.61 60.6  88     8 32    7   0  0  0 0 19 WNW  25  0 0 0 0  0 2400
LOU 72.2  50.3  61.3  86     5 40   14   0  0  0 0             6 0 0 0  0 0800
LYH             62.4  86     4 37   14             33 W    22             2400
NEW 74.39 49.10 61.75 89     2 37  8,31  0  0  0 0 35 W    13  2 0 0 0  8 1700
NPN 78.0  56.5  67.3  92    12 46  8,14  5  0  0 0 37 NE   12  6 0 0 0  2 2300
                                                   30 NW   18
NOR 79.1  58.5  68.8  90 11,12 47    9   2  0  0 0             5 0 0 0  1 2400
ORF 75.3  57.7  66.5  90    12 46    1   0  0  0 0 36 310° 12  6 0 0 0  3 2400 
POR 77.4  58.0  67.7  89    12 50 9,14,  0  0  0 0 35 W    22  4 0 0 0  1 2400 
                                  15,16
MEC 78    56    67.12 87   4,5 43    7   0  0  0 0             7 0 0 0  0 1800 
                         11,12
RIC 76.5  53.9  65.2  89    11 42    7   0  0  0 0 36 180° 25  6 0 0 0  2 2400 
RMD 78.0  56.8  67.4  89     5 42    8   0  0  0 0             2 0 0 0  0 2300 
ROA             64.8  89     4 42   14             51 W    22             2400 
ROK 76.2  52.9  64.5  90     4 38   14   1  0  0 0 28 NW   22  8 1 0 0  1 2200 
AKQ 78.39 52.84 65.61 89  5,12 39    7                                    2400 
WEE 75.3  54.3  64.8  88  4,11 40    7   0  0  0 0 30 N  6,13  5 1 0 0  1 1600 
WOO 71.0  53.6  62.3  85     4 44  7,31  4  0  0 0             4 0 0 1  3 0800 
WSH 73.8  52.2  63.03 91.1   4 37.8  7   0  0  0 0 14 ENE   5  4 1 0 0  0 2400 
                                                       SE  25
                                                      ENE  30
NORTH CAROLINA
STN  A      B    C    D      E F    G     H I  J K L  M     N  O P Q R R1 S
------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 
AVL 76.2  51.8  64.0  87 16,18 40   14   0  0  0 0 41 090°                2400 
BRE 76.0  51.1  63.6  86    16 37   37   0  0  0 0 22      20  0 0 0 0  8 1600 
                            11
CLT 80.4  55.9  68.2  90    19 46   23   1  0  0 0 29 170°                2400
CND 79.2  54.9  67.5  90.1  19 40.8 14   1  0  0 0 19 W    24  6 1 0 0  6 2400 
GSO 76.9  55.7  66.3  88    19 47    7                                    2400
LBT 82.8  56.5  69.6  93    19 47 1,14   3  0  0 0 46 270° 28  8 0 0 0  3 2400 
RAL 79.4  54.1  66.8  91    18 41   14   1  0  0 0 29      22  4 0 0 0  1 2400 
RDU 79.9  56.1  68.0  91    19 44   14   0
ROX 77.2  55.2  66.2  89    19 42   14   0  0  0 0 28 S    25  6 0 0 0  0 2100 
ILM 81.5  58.6  70.1  95    19 49  1,3   1  0  0 0 33 310° 28  5 1 0 0  5 2400
SOUTH CAROLINA
STN  A      B    C    D      E F    G    H  I  J K L  M     N  O P Q R R1 S
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CAE 85.5  59.9  72.7  95    18 50  1,3                                    2400
CHS 84.6  59.9  72.3  94    18 50 1,28   3  0  0 0 37 W    12  0 0 0 0  2 2400 
CRE 78.2  58.5  68.4  90    19 48    1   1  0  0 0 33 210° 22  3 0 0 0  6 2400 
FLO 86.0  58.5  72.3  95    19 49    1   8  0  0 0 31 260° 27  5 0 0 0  2 2400 
GSP 80.4  57.2  68.8  91 16,18 47   23   2  0  0 0 33 210°                2400 
OGB 85.2  58.7  71.9  96    18 48    1                                    2400
NEARBY LOCATIONS
STN  A      B    C    D      E F    G     H I  J K L  M     N  O P Q R R1 S
------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 
TRI 77.9  52.5  65.2  86  5,16 36   14   0  0  0 0                        2400 
                            17
CHW 63.0  46.9  54.9  75.5   3 32.0 31   0  0  1 0                        2400
(Please note the column denotations table below.)
PRECIPITATION / BAROMETRIC PRESSURE

VIRGINIA

STN  T     U       V      V1   W X   Y      Z  1  2 3    4    5      6       7        S
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ANN  4.82  1.51 22 1.52 21-22 10 3 16.12  0.0          0.0 12.8  30.58   6 29.72  22 2400
BCB  7.89                                                                            2400
BRI  3.74  0.97 21 1.52 21-22 13 0 12.30  0.0          0.0  8.6  30.33     29.80     0530/1600
CEN  3.91  1.26 22 1.63 21-22 10 1 14.63  0.0          0.0 14.2  30.55   5 29.70  22 2400
CHO  2.94  0.88 21 1.03 21-22 14 0        0.0          0.0                           2400
DCA  3.71  1.07 26 1.59 25-26 10 1 14.35  0.0          0.0  7.4  30.54   7 29.65  22 2400
IAD  5.69  2.07 22 2.67 21-22 12 2 15.99  0.0          0.0  9.8  30.55   7 29.69  22 2400
FCH  4.22  1.37 22 1.37    22  8 1 13.51  0.0          0.0 10.0                      2400 
HAM  3.25  1.05 21 1.50 25-26  7 2        0.0          0.0  1.5                      2400
                26
HRG  2.54  0.69 22 0.82 21-22 13 0 10.26  0.0          0.0 10.4  30.48   7 29.71  22 2400
HER  5.37  2.32 22 2.32    22 11 1 16.96  0.0          0.0 15.4  30.58   7 29.58  22 2400
HRN  5.43  2.18 22 2.18    22 12 1 16.87  0.0          0.0 13.0  30.523  7 29.710 22 2400
LKU  4.11  1.86 22 1.86    22 13 2 13.94                    3.0  30.57     29.76     2400
LOU  3.80  1.35         22-25  5 2 16.20  0.0          0.0  3.0  30.20     29.98     0800
LYH  4.31                                                                            2400
NEW  3.85  1.93 19            13 0 12.67  0.0          0.0 12.3                      1700
NPN  3.44  1.77 26 2.22 25-26 10 1 13.32  0.0          0.0  2.6  30.45   7 29.34  12 2300
NOR  3.78  1.87 26 1.87    26  9 2 14.46  0.0          0.0  1.3                      2400
ORF  2.89  1.07 21            10 2 12.71  0.0          0.0  1.6                      2400
POR  3.46  1.21 26 1.21    26 10 2 13.21  0.0          0.0  1.6  30.450  7 29.720 22 2400
MEC  2.45  0.63 26 0.69 25-26 10 0 14.77  0.0          0.0  5.4  30.00   7 29.28  22 1800
RIC  2.03  0.57 26 0.86 25-26 11 0 12.55  0.0          0.0  3.3                      2400
RMD  1.42  0.78 26             5 0 13.78  0.0          0.0  3.0                      2300
ROA  5.61                                                                            2400
ROK  6.68  1.52 15 2.33 15-16 15 2 16.90  0.0          0.0  7.4  30.48   6 29.60  22 2400
AKQ  4.10  1.70 26            13 2 13.33  0.0          0.0  8.0                   13 2400
WEE  3.97  0.61 19 2.00 25-26  9 0        0.0          0.0       30.39   8 29.62  28 1600
WOO  4.85          1.28 18-19 14 2 12.92  0.0          0.0 17.8  30.68   8 30.18  22 0800
WSH  4.11  1.10 19 1.37 18,19 13 0 13.68  0.0          0.0  9.5  30.58   7 29.76  22 2400
NORTH CAROLINA
STN  T     U       V      V1   W X   Y     Z   1  2 3  4     5       6       7        S
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AVL  2.47          1.04 24-25  8 0 14.15  0.0          0.0 15.5  30.38   7 29.75  22 2400
BRE  4.21  1.05 25            13 1 19.53  0.0          0.0  8.5  30.50   7 29.90   1 1600
                                                                        17 29.63  25
CLT  2.65  0.58 28 0.88 24-25 10 0 13.57  0.0          0.0  2.7  30.43     29.73     2400
CND  2.30  0.48 28 0.83 28-29  9 0 13.03  0.0          0.0  4.0  30.45   7 29.75  22 2400
GSO  2.69  0.71 16                                                                   2400
LBT  4.02  1.68 16 1.83 16-17 10 1 12.22  0.0          0.0  0.0  30.42   7 29.74  22 2400
RAL  2.51          0.47    16 13 0 15.66  0.0          0.0  3.0  30.48   7 29.74  22 1900
RDU  3.53          0.92 15-16
ROX  2.83  1.10 26 1.10    26 11 1 16.91  0.0          0.0  0.5  30.51   7 29.75  22 2100
                                                                                  23
ILM  3.08          1.39 27-28  8 1 15.20  0.0          0.0  0.2  30.38   7 29.79  23 2400
SOUTH CAROLINA
STN  T     U       V      V1   W X   Y     Z   1  2 3  4     5       6       7        S
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CAE  4.53                          14.24  0.0          0.0    T                      2400
CHS  1.36  0.44 12 0.53 22-23  6 0 11.98  0.0          0.0    T  30.34   7 29.80  22 2400
CRE  2.29  1.41 29 1.68 28-29  8 1 14.19  0.0          0.0  0.0  30.38   7 29.79  29 2400
FLO  1.76  1.14 29 1.18 29-30  7 1  9.86  0.0          0.0  0.0  30.40   7 29.75  22 2400
GSP  2.14  0.58 22             9 0 15.25  0.0          0.0  6.3  30.38   7 29.71  16 2400
OGB  2.59                          13.91  0.0          0.0                           2400
NEARBY LOCATIONS
STN  T     U       V      V1   W X   Y     Z   1  2 3  4     5       6       7        S
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TRI  4.07  0.93 22            13 0 16.72                                             2400
COLUMN DENOTATIONS:
A  maximum mean temperature T total precipitation (inches)
B  minimum mean temperature U maximum calendar day precipitation (inches)
C  monthly mean temperature U1 date of maximum calendar day precipitation
D  maximum temperature V date(s) of maximum daily precipitation
E  date(s) of maximum temperature V1 maximum 24-hour precip. & date(s)
F  minimum temperature W number of days with precip. >= .01"
G  date(s) of minimum temperature  X number of days with precip. >= 1.0"
H  days with maximum temperature >=90 Y year-to-date precipitation (inches)
I  days with maximum temperature <=32 Z maximum calendar day snowfall (inches)
J  days with minimum temperature <=32 1 date of maximum calendar day snowfall (inches)
K  days with minimum temperature <= 0  2 number of days with snowfall
L  peak wind gust (miles per hour) 3 number of days with snowfall >= 1.0"
M  direction of peak wind gust 4  total snowfall for month (inches)
N  date(s) of peak wind gust  5 total snowfall for 2000-2001 season (inches)
O  number of days with thunder  6 maximum barometric pressure (inches)
P  number of days with hail 6A date of maximum barometric pressure 
Q  number of days with glaze 7 minimum barometric pressure (inches)
R  number of days with ice pellets 7A date of minimum barometric pressure
R1 number of days with dense fog (i) incomplete data
S  local observation time for temps/precipitation (M) Missing, if listed in data table
 ~ "about" E estimated
 +  additional indeterminate number of days NR not recorded

STATION  /  LOCATION (MILES & DIRECTION FROM MAIN POST OFFICE) /
OBSERVER  / YEAR RECORDS BEGAN /  EMAIL ADDRESS:

ANN    Annandale, VA 1 3/4 ENE - Lowell Koontz  12/90  wwkoontz@bellatlantic.net ROK   Roanoke, VA 6SW Wendell Prillaman  4/76
DCA    Arlington, VA NWS Webmaster (Sterling):  james.decarufel@noaa.gov VNA    Vienna, VA Robert Boott, 1.5SW Robert.Boott@tma.osd.mil
BCB    Blacksburg, VA NWS Webmaster:  William.Perry@noaa.gov AKQ    Wakefield, VA NWS Webmaster:  Neil.Stuart@noaa.gov
BRI     Bridgewater, VA Clayton Towers Ctowers@rica.net WSH   Washington, VA  David Yowell runamok@runamok.com
CEN   Centreville, VA Paul Bassett 1985 pbassett@sitestar.net WEE   Weems, VA 3WNW Francis J. Socey
CHO   Charlottesville, VA  Airport ASOS  (Rappahannock County) WOO  Woodstock, VA 5NW Lauck Walton - 12/1/85 jwalton@shentel.net
IAD     Dulles International Airport  Webmaster (Sterling): james.decarufel@noaa.gov AVL    Asheville, NC NWS NWS GSP:  bryan.mcavoy@noaa.gov
FCH    Falls Church, VA Erica Page - 3/7/94 Windie1970@aol.com BRE    Brevard, NC 1SE Bob Keehn 1/1/90 Bob_Keehn@citcom.net
FRB    Fredericksburg, VA 7SW Ken McKneely mckneelys@email.msn.com CLT    Charlotte, NC NWS NWS GSP:  bryan.mcavoy@noaa.gov
HAM    Hampton, VA 5NE Dave Kessel 1989 dckessel@home.com CND  Concord, NC 3 W, Highway 73, 2 miles E of I85.  stormwatch@vnet.net
HRG    Harrisonburg, VA  Terry Slagle 5/2000 Altitude: 1306'  tslagle@rica.net GSO   Greensboro, NC NWS Webmaster (Raleigh/RAH): Richard.Jones@noaa.gov
HER    Herndon, VA R.M. Beall P- 10/76   T-  1/91 beall47@earthlink.net RAL    Raleigh, NC 7NNW  Bob Woodson 6/1/93 kf4mmm@qsl.net
HRN   Herndon, VA 4SW Russ Topping -  1985 weatherman@cox.rr.com RDU   Raleigh-Durham, NC NWS Webmaster:  Richard.Jones@noaa.gov
LKU     Louisa, VA 1N Joseph Bowers 1944 - NWS ID  44-5050-02 jmbiii@earthlink.net LBT    Lumberton, NC FAA Lumberton 34o 37'N 79o  04'W
LOU     Louisa, VA 6S John Bullock (about 1970) ROX    Roxboro, NC 2SE Merriell A. Jay 1/93
LYH     Lynchburg, VA NWS Webmaster (Blacksburg):  William.Perry@noaa.gov ILM     Wilmington, NC NWS  nwsilm@wilmington.net
NEW    Newmarket, VA 2W Joyce Winfree joywood@shentel.net CHS   Charleston, SC NWS, courtesy of Eleanor Vallier-Talbot
Eleanor.Vallier-Talbot@noaa.gov
evaltal@wpmedia.com
Webmaster Contents CHS: Theodore.Rodgers@noaa.gov
NPN     Newport News, VA 7N Gary Leonard -  6/91 GaryMLeonard@aol.com CAE    Columbia, SC NWS caewx@noaa.gov
NOR     Norfolk, VA 3NE Jim Fentress 6/1/77 OGB   Orangeburg, SC NWS caewx@noaa.gov
ORF     Norfolk, VA 5NE NWS 1871 Webmaster (Wakefield): Hugh.Cobb@noaa.gov GSP   Greenville-Spartanburg, SC NWS bryan.mcavoy@noaa.gov
POR     Portsmouth, VA 3S Bill Trotter -  7/1/76  pwrs@pilot.infi.net RUB    Ruby, SC 3 NW Franklin Hancock
MEC     Mechanicsville, VA Glen Martin 11/19/91 FLO    Florence, SC nwsilm@wilmington.net
RMD    Richmond, VA Roy Britt 8/22/83  roybritt@earthlink.net CRE    North Myrtle Beach, SC  nwsilm@wilmington.net
RIC     Richmond, VA NWS TRI     Tri-cities/Bristol, TN  NWS Webmaster (Morristown):W-Mrx.Webmaster@noaa.gov
ROA    Roanoke, VA  Webmaster (Blacksburg):  William.Perry@noaa.gov CHW  Canaan Heights, WV Dave Lesher  wxdave@boo.net